New Music 10/15/15

Brotherhood members team up and deliver a new smooth catchy single for folks to groove to.

The first single for MJ Withers’ new album “MJW”. An upbeat ominous banger with an aggressive delivery and hype for ages.

A quick freestyle from crazy ol’ Shirt on a head-knockingous beat by Spectacular Diagnosis.

“GAF” is a breakout single, slow club banger by the group Rumour Hasit with rapper and vocalist, Taylor King and Nick Thomas.

Catch more new music on my soundcloud and Cymbal page: itzme

Analysis | Soule – Dark Memories

“Dark Memories” by Soule is one example of an excellent hip-hop song that embodies a mood, tells a story, has clever and/or deep lines, and flows smoothly with back-to-back transitions. On top of that, it’s produced by the amazing Suede Moccasins who hooks it up once again. It possesses many of the things I love about hip-hop music, and one of the few songs I got excited about last year.

“Pray your clock shows hands in just one direction, cuz it’s hard for you to follow”

This bar directly references back to the hook where the character in the story (addressed in second person) has a lost concept of time, immortally unchanged like a ghost.

What’s also interesting about this bar is that it transitions perfectly into the verse in multiple ways.

It brings to attention the stagnant and lost mindset that the character has, which is the setting for this verse in the song. The actual mind of the character is drawn out like a tangible place. A place that is very rejecting, and deleterious of past memories. A very blank, lonely, and mundane state of mind that prefers being void from human interaction. This is described in the next line (among others):

“That’s what it’s like being a NEET,

then you get all neat”

A NEET(Not in Education, Employment, or Training) being a layabout who stays at home and doesn’t do much of anything, and rhyming with the homophone “neat” showing that they live unfulfilled and must occupy with idle cleaning. This also begins a very aggressive rhyme pattern:

“cleaning the house, the defeat,

makes you plow.

Don’t have the passion right now to”

The contrast of this bar from the non-rhyming of opening bar breaks listeners into the second verse and sets the pace for it. This bar is so aggressive for several reasons. First, that the rhyme scheme and cadence are very intricate, following an AA-BA-B-B pattern where house is used as an internal rhyme that is later pushed out as an end rhyme which sets the simpler pattern for the rest of the verse after a transition using another faster paced rhyme:

“talk with you, walk with you”

That point brings me to this: the sudden aggressiveness is the frustration of the narrator of dealing with this character. The first two lines are a very vague and somewhat glazed-over description that the narrator uses to describe the character’s mindset, but when digging deeper it becomes a source of frustration. Then the simplifying of the cadence/rhyme scheme is the calming down and acceptance of this setting. “Don’t have the passion right now” is a verbal sigh of exasperation and ceasing to struggle to hold onto the relationship. “talk with you, walk with you, do the same things like Geminis, how the stars move” is a very repetitive (yet not redundant) overstatement used as a device to show how close knit this relationship was. They talked together, they walked together, they were like twins. They revolved in the same pattern like the stars seem to do in the night sky.

Cleverly, this ties into an onslaught of astrology themed metaphors and references:

“I was a Leo in the sky, now I’m sagging like a Sag

reminiscing real hard on the year we have shared

that goes out to every astrological being that is there”

Pretty apparent, but this is saying this took a bit out pep out the speaker’s step. The wording, repetition and delivery makes the feeling come out of the words. “Leo in the sky” gives the image of a proud king of the jungle standing high over creation with utmost pride; whereas “sagging like a Sag” defines a lowly, rock-kicking persona (even further defined by the pet name for Sagittarius, which pronounces the ‘g’ differently). And “shared” was also spoken in a lower somber tone. yadayada

“you caught the arrow that cupid was trying to aim at your head

not your heart, that’s why you think too much instead.

‘Stead of staying in touch, you try to grow apart”

Adding to the setting of the character’s mindset, the speaker uses cupid’s aim as a metaphor for their approach to the situation. Their approach is loveless and riddled in overthink, making staying in touch needlessly difficult and frustrating.

“What does that say about us?

For real, you keep that state of mind I can’t trust

instead of making memories, you want memorials

everything I paved, you want to bury those”

That says the character wants nothing to do with this situation. As stated before, this person is “rejecting and deleterious”. The expression is that there is no good to be had from this situation, they are denying any chance of a positive relationship or hindsight. “Memories” could be a good remembrance of the experience, but instead the person desires “memorials”, as in dead. Buried. Everything built in the relationship, buried. This mindset drenched in overthink that destroys any “light” or positivity is like a betrayal to the speaker. Considering that once they were peas-in-the-pod or “like Geminis”, the fact that things are the polar opposite just makes the person impossible to trust (considering the diction “can’t”).

I feel like these lines are the key relation of the song to the title.

Be on the lookout for Soule’s Connection project.

Dooby & Kilo Present to You: the Melodies of the 42nd Symphony

A simple 6-track EP from a rapper and producer with versatile and groovy styles. The instrumentals have tons of personality and soul, and Kilo’s vocals complete the puzzle. Melodies have a lil sumn for errbody with the smooth r&b-type track, storytelling, knowledge kick, and some braggadose.

Cold Playlist| Single Featuring

I respect and share good music. Here are some songs that glide above the sea of singles being thrown across on the internet through links, that you need to be aware of. These tracks foreshadow a flood of bar-setting music voming in the near future.

OXYxMORON – “You Don’t Know”

Well you should. The past couple of years Oxy has been laying down some truly excellent music. In this recent pocket of history they have been one of the best hip-hop acts out, and this song is no exception. “You Don’t Know” is a triumphant return, that’s just so bright and exciting as a hero’s welcome. The song has the power to turn crowds of listeners into choirs.

Lord Byron – “0 Grams Fat”

Byron switches up the style to create this kingpin-steelo soaked banger. Byron exemplifies the presence of a don by giving game over this anxious, squealing, rock-inspired instrumental. The song carries a sort of edginess and intensity that’s not only different from Byron’s previous work, but from everything else. Short, heavy, and catchy… Let’s see what Byron comes up with next.

Ciscero – “Never Make It”

Ciscero teams up with the rap superhuman, Sir EU, to denounce the evils of “hating on your homies”, and proclaim his impending ascension to success. Subdaio produces something surreal and phasey for them to rap on, with the use of watery synths. The sound results in a dark and reflective imagery. Meanwhile, Ciscero’s verse showcases a climaxing aggression with champion rhythm; EU opens with some heavily rhyme-laden bars and some deep expressionism.

Itzme Review: Ab Soul – These Days…

Ab-Soul has his sophomore album release after two years. Many have come to love and enjoy Ab’s music by being introduced through the “Ab-Soul Outro” on Section.80, and his excellent last release Control System. Besides being associated with a popular group of emcees, he’s also known for his cleverness in his lyrics. Despite this, Ab-Soul has failed to deliver on his new album after proving himself so well. Let me take you to a land void of any profoundness, creativity, soul, and personality (and overpopulated with obscure Jesus comparisons); the place on the cover art.

I don't even think a roach can survive out there

Just look at it, there’s no support of life.

These Days is jam-packed with cliché and unoriginality. A prime example is the halfway point of the album, “TWACT”, where listeners are given a My Krazy Life reject song with a corny catchphrase that’s doomed to never catch on. On “World Runners” Ab-Soul shows you how well he can mimic a mainstream faux-inspirational rap song. Even with the song’s blurred message, he manages to come across extremely preachy. Soul even directly copies his groupmate Kendrick Lamar with the “Kendrick Lamar Interlude” the antithesis of the Ab-Soul outro.

The lack of creativity doesn’t just stop with the mimicry, but also in damn near every single chorus/bridge on the whole album. The majority of the hooks on the album consist of Ab-Soul repeating a very short phrase over and over and over and over again. And even on the ones with a little variation (emphasis on little), they fail to cross the line from annoying to catchy. Hooks are only one part of the song, but Ab made sure to put this in his verses as well. The automatic skip and epic streak-ender of the “Druggys with Hoes” series known as “Hunnid Stacks”, features two of the same verses by the same rapper–oh wait…

“Feelin’ Us” also repeats the cycle of painful repetition to the maximum with the quadruplets of “raise your hands, say Soulo hoe” and “now mama don’t cry no mo’” randomly slapped in the middle of his verses.

The part where this redundancy fails where most hip-pop tracks don’t fail as hard, is that the latter’s beats are usually more moving. A handful of beats on her are pretty good, but none exceed any expectations.

Ab-Soul struggles with structure in his latest release. Proof is the scatterbrained-ness of “Nevermind That” with BJ the Chicago Kid singing so sweetly at the most random times. “Nevermind That” just screams tourrettes, with its left-field breaks and tempo. There’s also the needlessly long beat ride-outs on “Ride Slow”. The biggest surprise of These Days is that almost all the songs are aimless and have no feeling. In the Black-lip Pastor’s previous works, he were a lot of self-expressive works: songs like “Book of Soul” and “Be A Man”. As mentioned in the intro, this album is void of that.

I don't even think a roach can survive out there

I don’t even think a roach can survive out there

Fortunately, the song “Closure” prevents the album from being completely soulless. It’s actually one of the few good songs on the project, which is ironic because it’s an all singing song on a rap album.

“Tree of Life” sounds like an adventurous soundtrack to Ab’s exploration of the multiple definitions of “tree”. “Stigmata” was a rather appropriate title single to the album, especially when it cut out the ending verses for the video, because it’s a pretty good beat and verse with an epic hook that goes against the grain of this album.

“Ride Slow” features the Hybrid picking up slack with a verse that takes you back the good times of 2012, when he wrecked every instrumental he spit on. And the album ends with a rap battle where clever bars are exchanged between Ab and Daylyt—something different. These moments are to few and far between to redeem all the faults of These Days, however.

One can really tell that an album is lacking when it’s more exciting to talk about why it was bad, than to talk about the actual album itself. There are plenty of theories,

absoultweet

but at the end of the day the album remains disappointing. It contains a few rare peeks of what Soul is actually capable of. Perhaps These Days is Ab-Soul’s discographical death so he can rise again.

Room temperature at best.

Favorite Songs: “Closure” “Tree of Life” “Stigmata” “Just Have Fun” Danny Brown’s verse in “Ride Slow”

Songs That Blew Me: Almost everything else

Stay Frosty.